Barbados, Pearl of the Caribbean

Barbados coast

Often described as the “Pearl of the Caribbean, Barbados is located at the eastern-most end of the Caribbean Sea. Barbados, unlike other nearby islands is not volcanically formed, but is in actuality a huge coral reef which dates back to more than one million years from now. Quite befitting the nickname ‘the real fantasy island’ the pristine beaches are the highlight of Barbados’ attributes. The Sun shines more than 335 days a year on Barbados, and innumerous travelers come here from North America and Europe when the freezing winter months leave no option but to search out a sanctuary.

And what a sanctuary! Barbados is among the bets developed islands in the Caribbean, and there is no dearth to necessary comforts, and there are all the facilities that one can expect of a nation that is so well developed. The developed amenities make for a great island holiday with no compromise in key comforts.

The nightlife at Barbados is one of the most pulsating in the entire Caribbean, no island, except for may be Trinidad comes close to the festive spirit that this island is gifted with. The residents of Barbados are always on the lookout to celebrate, and there are quite a lot of opportunities to do so. The festivals and celebrations are times of reveling, and you can see heavenly beauties swaying their hips to calypso rhythms. The throbbing party scenes are one of the major reasons why Barbados is so popular with a lot of people.

Barbados Beach
Barbados Beach

The inhabitants are a warm and friendly race, and are known Bajans. Most of the bajans are West Indian descendents along with a lot of influences as a commonwealth evident. Barbados has been called “Little England” because of the British influences in architecture and other fields of life. There are also a good number of British citizens. Golfing, horse racing and other British sports are also enjoyed, and Cricket is much loved, as well as tea drinking. As Barbados was solely under British occupation, a lot of the British architecture has escaped destruction.

There are numerous Anglican Stone churches, which can be seen in most parts of the island. Barbados is separated into parishes, and there are many examples of British architecture in these, the churches being just a few. The cricket games that get played on the fields are another example of the Anglo influence. When under occupation, Barbados had a booming sugar industry. Barbados became independence and came under self governance in the year 1966. Tourism is now the major contributor to the national income.

The pear shaped island has a coastline scratching for more than 32 kilo meters ( 20 miles ) of pristine coral sands, and many of these are beautiful coral gardens, that have formed caverns in the ground due to the activity of the sea and sun. There are some beautiful coral reefs here, which have made the island one of the best loved among Caribbean travelers because of the heavenly stretches of sand.

Barbados coast
Barbados coast

Barbados is one of the most beautiful islands in the Caribbean, and is much loved for its English influences that have earned the name “Little England to the island.